Trends

Keeping the foodservice equipment marketplace up to date with the latest menu and concept trends.

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Monorail system replaces conveyor-style approach to serving patrons; allows restaurant expanding seating while maintaining staff levels

Whether it’s a piece of robotic equipment or a more technologically advanced piece of traditional equipment, foodservice operators weigh the pros and cons in terms of staff time and ROI before purchasing.

It appears as if the lingering effects of COVID-19 will continue to suppress restaurant industry sales for at least one more year.

Among national and regional restaurant chains today, those not making plays in the virtual brand and ghost kitchen arenas are quickly becoming exceptions. But small, independent operators and entrepreneurs continue to find a home in ghost kitchens too, shifting their focus from that most fundamental barometer of success — butts in seats — to clicks on apps. Here’s how 2 Korean Girls is tapping in and what they’ve learned by crossing over into the virtual sphere.

Using uncommon cuts of beef, pork, lamb and chicken has become more prevalent as restaurants focus more on reducing food waste and cost.

Since jumping into ghost kitchens in 2019 via Kitchen United, and later CloudKitchens, Pasadena, Calif.-based Dog Haus has grown its digital-kitchen footprint to nine locations across three states.

The National Association of College & University Food Services (NACUFS) awarded Hope College’s dining program with a gold medal for the Loyal E. Horton Dining Award for Residential Dining Concepts (Medium Institution). The award, says Dan Zehr, director of residential and retail dining, was based on the college’s allergen-friendly station and program called The Zone.

The oven-range combination often becomes a good solution for operations tight on space or that offer baked entrees like meatloaf or lasagna. Keeping these units running properly becomes critical for every kitchen that has them.

By incorporating a variety of textures, colors and items, restaurants can create tabletops that not only showcase their menus but also convey a sense of community and safety.

Toronto-based Ghost Kitchen Brands (GKB), launched in 2016 by entrepreneur George Kottas, has evolved from a classic ghost kitchen selling its own brands from over 20 delivery-only facilities in Canada into virtual food courts selling multiple national and international restaurant brands from ghost kitchens placed in high-traffic, high-visibility locations in Canada and the U.S. The company’s president, Marc Choy, a former Quiznos executive, fills us in.

Healthcare foodservice operations continue to adjust to a recalibrated normal as states lift restrictions that were in place to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Among national and regional restaurant chains today, those not making plays in the virtual brand and ghost kitchen arenas are quickly becoming exceptions. But small, independent operators and entrepreneurs continue to find a home in ghost kitchens too, shifting their focus from that most fundamental barometer of success — butts in seats — to clicks on apps. Here’s how Ghost Truck Kitchen is tapping in and what they’ve learned by crossing over into the virtual sphere.

The pandemic proved a tipping point, laying bare the inefficiencies and limitations of traditional brick-and-mortar operations while driving consumers en masse toward contactless, off-premises meal solutions.

With health and sustainability at the forefront, plant-forward concepts and offerings continue to blossom.

At this point in the pandemic recovery, most restaurants have opened their doors. And schools, corporate cafeterias and other non-commercial foodservice operators find themselves in the process of preparing for reopening. Restarting a kitchen’s hot side presents one set of challenges, while refrigeration and cleaning equipment have another.

Among national and regional restaurant chains today, those not making plays in the virtual brand and ghost kitchen arenas are quickly becoming exceptions. But small, independent operators and entrepreneurs continue to find a home in ghost kitchens too, shifting their focus from that most fundamental barometer of success — butts in seats — to clicks on apps. Here’s how Garrett Hospitality Group is tapping in and sharing what they’ve learned by crossing over into the virtual sphere.