Trends

Keeping the foodservice equipment marketplace up to date with the latest menu and concept trends.

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Among national and regional restaurant chains today, those not making plays in the virtual brand and ghost kitchen arenas are quickly becoming exceptions. But small, independent operators and entrepreneurs continue to find a home in ghost kitchens too, shifting their focus from that most fundamental barometer of success — butts in seats — to clicks on apps. Here’s how 2 Korean Girls is tapping in and what they’ve learned by crossing over into the virtual sphere.

Among national and regional restaurant chains today, those not making plays in the virtual brand and ghost kitchen arenas are quickly becoming exceptions. But small, independent operators and entrepreneurs continue to find a home in ghost kitchens too, shifting their focus from that most fundamental barometer of success — butts in seats — to clicks on apps. Here’s how four diverse brands are tapping in and what they’ve learned by crossing over into the virtual sphere.

Since jumping into ghost kitchens in 2019 via Kitchen United, and later CloudKitchens, Pasadena, Calif.-based Dog Haus has grown its digital-kitchen footprint to nine locations across three states.

Shaking up a segment grounded more on convenience than culinary appeal, ghost kitchen and virtual brand juggernaut C3 (Creating Culinary Communities) has partnered with globally renowned chefs to create a portfolio of new digital restaurant brands.

The oven-range combination often becomes a good solution for operations tight on space or that offer baked entrees like meatloaf or lasagna. Keeping these units running properly becomes critical for every kitchen that has them.

NAFEM president Rob Connelly answers questions about this years' trade show.

Toronto-based Ghost Kitchen Brands (GKB), launched in 2016 by entrepreneur George Kottas, has evolved from a classic ghost kitchen selling its own brands from over 20 delivery-only facilities in Canada into virtual food courts selling multiple national and international restaurant brands from ghost kitchens placed in high-traffic, high-visibility locations in Canada and the U.S. The company’s president, Marc Choy, a former Quiznos executive, fills us in.

Is it the right time for restaurants to begin building up their tabletops? These foodservice professionals are giving a resounding yes.

Among national and regional restaurant chains today, those not making plays in the virtual brand and ghost kitchen arenas are quickly becoming exceptions. But small, independent operators and entrepreneurs continue to find a home in ghost kitchens too, shifting their focus from that most fundamental barometer of success — butts in seats — to clicks on apps. Here’s how Ghost Truck Kitchen is tapping in and what they’ve learned by crossing over into the virtual sphere.

As foodservice operators continue to evolve, so too must the supply chain that serves them. From a distance, though, it may not look as if a lot has changed among the individual links in the foodservice equipment supply chain. But a closer look reveals much has changed about the way that individual companies go to market, how they work with each other and more.

With health and sustainability at the forefront, plant-forward concepts and offerings continue to blossom.

This past year has seen tremendous change in the foodservice industry. One thing that remains the same, however, is a continuing desire among both operators and consumers for open kitchens.

Among national and regional restaurant chains today, those not making plays in the virtual brand and ghost kitchen arenas are quickly becoming exceptions. But small, independent operators and entrepreneurs continue to find a home in ghost kitchens too, shifting their focus from that most fundamental barometer of success — butts in seats — to clicks on apps. Here’s how Garrett Hospitality Group is tapping in and sharing what they’ve learned by crossing over into the virtual sphere.

Now that research has shown little-to-no risk of transmitting the virus through hard surfaces, we have seen reusable containers come back to campus.

For some chefs and operators, providing extraordinary guest experiences hinges in part on taking extraordinary operational steps, doing what few competitors are willing or able to do to set their menus and their brands apart.

Mix one part comfort food and one part sociability with two parts nostalgia and you’ll have the recipe for the success of diners. This formula has worked for decades, but will it work in the future?