Trends

Keeping the foodservice equipment marketplace up to date with the latest menu and concept trends.

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From Sous Vide to Pickling to Liquid Nitrogen and a few others, this month's Specifier takes a closer look at these foodservice operator defined trendy preparation techniques and the operational considerations associated with them.

Both consumer and commercial grade products can earn Energy Star ratings. But the testing that goes into achieving this rating can differ dramatically depending on product category. Such is the case with commercial kitchen equipment.

Some say the Kimpton Hotel group was ahead of its time almost a decade ago when they started introducing environmentally friendly initiatives before the term "green" had washed over the country.

In researching its article "The Truth and Consequences about Energy Star," FE&S requested an interview with a representative from Energy Star and the Environmental Protection Agency. Unfortunately, the EPA could not arrange an interview but its media relations department did provide answers via email to the six questions submitted by FE&S. Below please find the EPA's responses to FE&S' questions about the Energy Star program.

Sourcing energy-efficient and water-saving equipment and reducing waste in labor and production are ways to develop more sustainable foodservice operations.

Everyone knows about Energy Star. What most foodservice professionals don't realize is that the program is about to undergo some significant changes that could impact the industry.

Veteran service agent Bruce Peeling shares some basic foodservice equipment maintenance tips that will help ensure an item continues to function at peak efficiency.

Developing innovative and successful restaurant concepts is nothing new for Chris Newcomb. As one of the founders of McAlister's Deli, along with partners Don Newcomb and Debra Bryson, he has a keen insight into the fast-casual restaurant segment.

When trying to create an environmentally friendly foodservice environment, most operators take the proper first step of specifying energy-efficient equipment. What often gets overlooked, though, is the fact maintaining an energy-efficient environment is much more of an ongoing process that requires proper cleaning and maintenance of equipment.

Due to their versatility, portability, perceived freshness and value, sandwiches are one of the most popular menu items in all types of U.S. restaurants. The top 500 sandwich chains accounted for almost $20 billion in sales in 2009, a .8 percent increase from a year prior, according to a 2010 report by Chicago-based research firm Technomic.

Next month, all eyes in the foodservice equipment and supplies space will be on Orlando, Fla., thanks to the biennial NAFEM Show. This event will be all about the products and the innovative ways we, as foodservice professionals, use them. While the show does a wonderful job of shining a spotlight on foodservice technology, other market factors, such as the new healthcare legislation and the never-ending drive to enhance productivity, continue to increase awareness in this area.

The vast majority of foodservice operators require an ice machine to help chill beverages and hold food at safe temperatures. But because ice can touch many parts of a foodservice operation, selecting the proper unit requires some thought and planning. Here is a quick look at several key factors foodservice operators and their supply chain partners should consider when specifying an ice machine.

Three veteran foodservice consultants provide their take on some of the leading foodservice trends and the related design and equipment issues. 

West Virginia University's five-year project brought its dated foodservice facilities into the 21st century

Brad Barnes, CMC, the first NAFEM endowed professor at the Culinary Institute of America, says getting the most out of attending The NAFEM Show starts with doing your homework and creating a plan well before your plane touches down in Orlando. It also takes being proactive on the show floor. Here's his one-two punch strategy for working the show: