Trends

Keeping the foodservice equipment marketplace up to date with the latest menu and concept trends.

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High-volume operators use tray lines to make up many meals at once and to clean afterwards.

Changes in consumer dining patterns have lead foodservice operators to update the way they purchase supply items like paper goods, flatware, china and the like. As a result, dealers have had to alter their approach to serving their customers.

As the sandwich concept continues to grow in popularity and variety, operators require foodservice equipment to support prep and holding tasks specific to their menus.

Just like their parents, children in the U.S. have expanded their food repertoire.

Thanks to consumers' interest in healthier and portable foods that can be eaten on the go, the juice-bar segment of the foodservice industry continues to prosper.

Many foodservice companies are searching for innovative ideas but the easiest one to implement may be creating a greener operation.

Upscale menus, high end décor and a focus on quality and service have become common sports bar attributes.

Americans' growing taste for Mexican-inspired cuisine continues to drive this foodservice segment to new heights, despite a challenging business environment.

By streamlining operations and incorporating efficient equipment, the Italian restaurant segment has held up in hard times.

The notion of designing a smart kitchen is not a new one. What is new, though, is how the evolution of foodservice technology affects the way the industry defines a smart kitchen today.

Although wine bars typically attract an upscale demographic, these operations are being positioned as a less costly option for consumers.

During the past 12 months, the concept of scheduled maintenance has become more popular among foodservice operators. This is likely due to the challenging economy, which has operators from all industry segments trying to maximize the service life of the foodservice equipment in their kitchens. While the renewed interest in scheduled maintenance is good, it’s equally important for the operator to see this as a value-added program and not a necessary evil.

As the first hotel in Illinois to achieve LEED Certification status, the Hotel Arista in Naperville uses 30 percent less water and 21 percent less energy than hotels of comparable size by adhering to the USGBC's standards.

As foodservice operators examine their expenses, they are using total cost of ownership to help make purchasing decisions that generate a higher return on investment.

Effective Waste Management for Today and Tomorrow's Foodservice Industry