Trends

Keeping the foodservice equipment marketplace up to date with the latest menu and concept trends.

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When the first Fatburger opened in Los Angeles back in 1952, it was a local hamburger joint with a diner motif. Today, there are more than 100 locations in California and Nevada, with sites planned for South Korea, Dubai, Lebanon and Saudi Arabia.

Revit is a form of building information management software that is slowly starting to take root in the foodservice industry. While certain members of the foodservice equipment supply chain, namely consultants and manufacturers, are more involved with Revit than others at this point, in the not-so-distant future most every member of the foodservice industry will need to be proficient with this new technology.

When Bull City Burger and Brewery opened its doors in March of last year, the goal was not only to serve burgers its customers would come back for, but also to play an integral part in the cycle of energy from the farms it sources.

Those who are skeptical about the quality of foodservice programs in today’s senior care facilities would be pleasantly surprised by the operations at Legacy Retirement Communities in Lincoln, Neb. Alongside the casseroles, chicken fried steak and other traditional comfort food are menu items reminiscent of an upscale steakhouse, such as beef tenderloin, lobster and prime rib.

Saving on labor costs can be a matter of properly applying foodservice equipment and training.

Once a key source of industry growth, the casual-dining segment has dealt with more than its fair share of challenges in recent years. Getting casual dining back on track will include developing more flexible formats, faster service and more.

Proper servicing of foodservice equipment can be a very demanding and rewarding proposition for both the service agent and the operator.

The introduction of Revit to the foodservice industry has drawn some natural comparisons to other computer-driven tools, namely AutoCAD. These tools are similar in that both allow foodservice designers to use a computer to develop detailed kitchen drawings, and upon their introduction to the foodservice communities both were perceived as relatively new technologies that required training.

CFESA's 11-point checklist shows foodservice operators what to look for when identifying possible service needs.

Some basics on the challenges of international expansion.

There are pros and cons to everything in life — and applying for LEED certification on a project is no different.

Successful menu innovation means getting more out of existing resources and minimizing waste while providing customers with high-quality dining options regardless of the foodservice segment.

The senior care foodservice segment is undergoing a transformation as more upscale restaurants continue to replace institutionalized dining halls. As a result, today’s residents have more dining options, including snack bars, bistros, pubs, hotel-like room service and catering.

Hotels are placing a renewed focus on food and beverage sales. This is because the segment has discovered that a distinguishable restaurant is a draw not only for overnight guests but also for locals. In other words, it’s a win-win.

As the tastes and needs of their clientele continue to evolve, so too must the way senior care facilities manage their foodservice operations. Such is the case with Atria on the Hudson, an Ossining, N.Y.-based senior care facility with more than 60 residents.

An engaged and cooperative supply chain can go a long way toward helping foodservice operators function in a more effective and efficient manner. Cultivating a collaborative environment that allows this to happen requires clear and consistent communication and all parties understanding and executing their roles.

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