Trends

Keeping the foodservice equipment marketplace up to date with the latest menu and concept trends.

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Like their retail peers, non-commercial operators continue to adopt smaller, more flexible formats as they strive to marry speed of service with quality menu items.

When the first Fatburger opened in Los Angeles back in 1952, it was a local hamburger joint with a diner motif. Today, there are more than 100 locations in California and Nevada, with sites planned for South Korea, Dubai, Lebanon and Saudi Arabia.

Especially in today's economy, businesses recognize that time is money. Despite a slower economic environment, a growing number of companies continue to invest in their business and industry foodservice operations as a way to drive efficiency.

When Bull City Burger and Brewery opened its doors in March of last year, the goal was not only to serve burgers its customers would come back for, but also to play an integral part in the cycle of energy from the farms it sources.

Coming into the B&I industry in 2003 after working as a food and beverage manager for the Ritz-Carlton, Damian Monticello, now corporate foodservice liaison with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, quickly realized he was entering a different world entirely.

Saving on labor costs can be a matter of properly applying foodservice equipment and training.

Planning, developing and implementing composting programs continues to get easier for foodservice operators because more operators are electing to take these environmentally friendly steps. As role models for their peers, they help both commercial and noncommercial operators follow in that path.

Proper servicing of foodservice equipment can be a very demanding and rewarding proposition for both the service agent and the operator.

It's one thing to offer special diet options but without proper training and follow-through it might be a futile effort. 

CFESA's 11-point checklist shows foodservice operators what to look for when identifying possible service needs.

Soft-serve equipment holds product in a frozen state for long periods of time until portions are dispensed.

There are pros and cons to everything in life — and applying for LEED certification on a project is no different.

Other market segments look to replicate the success of fast-casual concepts.

The senior care foodservice segment is undergoing a transformation as more upscale restaurants continue to replace institutionalized dining halls. As a result, today’s residents have more dining options, including snack bars, bistros, pubs, hotel-like room service and catering.

Greenwashing, or exaggerating the environmentally friendly selling points of a product, happens in all avenues of foodservice, and is no longer the exclusive domain of organically produced or farm fresh ingredients.

As the tastes and needs of their clientele continue to evolve, so too must the way senior care facilities manage their foodservice operations. Such is the case with Atria on the Hudson, an Ossining, N.Y.-based senior care facility with more than 60 residents.