Foodservice by Design

Team members from PROFITALITY discuss how industrial engineering can be applied to the foodservice industry.

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A growing number of foodservice operators are turning to off-premise service options to enhance customer convenience and increase sales.

Keeping technology simple and applicable is as important as bells and whistles

Happy New Year to all!

If you are like me, you have made a few New Year's resolutions. Common resolutions include adopting a more healthful lifestyle through diet and exercise. In addition, when the calendar rolled over to 2011, the foodservice industry found itself facing many new regulations that require operators to communicate nutritional information about the food they sell.

Industry pros came together to inspire and enlighten

 

Martinez's latest post on fast-casual concepts provides a closer look at the attributes they try to leverage as a point of differentiation from their competition.

Defining a fast-casual concept isn't as easy as it once was. 

The fast-casual segment seems to be the darling of the foodservice industry — and with good reason, if you look at some of the industry data. According to market research firm Technomic, the fast-casual segment is in the best position to achieve real growth this year and next.

Here is a look at three different ways foodservice operators can go about pursuing an integrated design for their concepts.

FIt is not enough to understand the six operating parameters that exist within any foodservice operations. Rather, it’s equally important to know how they relate to one another.

For a concept's drive-thru to be successful it must serve the interests of both the customers and the staff.

We are about to start a new era for Foodservice Equipment & Supplies magazine. It is indeed great news that the industry's leading publication is ready to take flight again.