E&S Extra

Editorial Director Joe Carbonara provides insights and commentary on the state of the foodservice equipment and supplies marketplace.

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If you stop and stare at one long enough, you can probably see a restaurant or foodservice operation evolve before your very eyes.

All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players.” William Shakespeare wrote those words as part of his classic comedy “As You Like It.” In many respects, that same idea applies to commercial kitchens and equipment packages, particularly in this era, where transparency rules the day.

 Savvy operators will require more in the form of information and training.

Business leaders often look over their shoulders trying to find the next disruptive player or event that will shake up their organizations. Well, in a matter of weeks spanning August to the beginning of September, the foodservice industry got a double dose of disruption.

Planning to renovate a commercial kitchen? Here are four steps critical to the success of any project.

When trying to assess the health of an industry, many people look to the macroeconomic factors that often impact performance. Two factors regularly linked to the foodservice industry include national employment levels and personal disposable income, among others.

The foodservice industry tends to be rather transient. Rarely a day goes by that we don’t receive word of someone changing companies for numerous reasons.

Ask any foodservice operator and they will rightfully tell you their business is pretty complicated. But nowhere is that more the case than in today's healthcare foodservice industry.

 

For so many members of my generation, the lasting image of college foodservice remains a less than positive one. We entered meal periods hoping for the best but never truly knowing what we would get. Naturally, when looking at today's college foodservice environment, we can't help but marvel at the progress this industry segment continues to make.

Beyond the varied menu and service styles, food halls often feature a retail component, which allows customers to take a portion of their experience home to enjoy later.

Forget the talk about the impact Millennials and Generation Z continue to have on the foodservice industry. Among all the trends affecting today’s foodservice industry, technology has the most profound impact.

Foodservice really isn’t foodservice. In the recent past, as the name implies, foodservice operations simply provided food as a service to their customers, whether that took the form of a restaurant, a cafeteria, patient feeding, etc. Today, however, executing that menu represents but one small ingredient in a foodservice operation’s recipe for success.

It's fairly common for people to refer to their co-workers as family. And that often happens with good reason. Start with the simple fact that in a given work week you likely spend as much or more time working with your work family as you do with your actual family.

In the foodservice equipment and supplies industry, evolution continues to take different forms. And at no time was that more evident than during the month of June.

All aspects of the foodservice industry love the romance of the entrepreneur. The story usually involves someone having a vision and the determination to see it through and applies equally to operators, consultants, dealers, reps and service agents.

Real growth continues to be hard to come by for the foodservice industry. In fact, overall customer traffic was flat through the first quarter of 2016, according to The NPD Group, a market research firm covering the foodservice industry. Revenues and customer traffic may be inching along, but one area growing at breakneck speed is labor costs.

People eat with their eyes first.

Ask healthcare foodservice professionals about some of the challenges that keep them up at night and they will try to tell you their businesses are much like other industry segments. And, in a sense, they are right.