Trends

Keeping the foodservice equipment marketplace up to date with the latest menu and concept trends.

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Sliced, diced, shredded, spiralized, juiced — no matter how foodservice operators use or serve it, fresh produce keeps growing its presence on the plate. Trends like plant-forward menus, farm-to-table concepts, vegan and vegetarian diets, clean eating, and whole foods continue to flourish. And that means more produce coming in the back door — cases and cases of it, all needing to be kept cool, trimmed, washed, drained, processed, prepped and stored again before service.

There was a time when patient feeding was the center of the healthcare foodservice universe. Thanks to insurance companies and managed care, though, the length of time patients spend in hospitals continues to shrink. As a result, most healthcare foodservice operations tend to resemble more of a hybrid model, one that includes some patient feeding with a growing emphasis on corporate dining/retail solutions, catering and more.

Food and nutrition services leaders in hospitals and senior living facilities face daunting challenges in this era of unpredictability about government funding, the effect of mergers and acquisitions among healthcare systems and staff recruiting and retention.

Paul Pumputis was not wired for a career as an electrician in upstate New York. He began wiring houses during the construction season but like so many others would often get laid off when winter rolled around and building ground to a halt. Looking for something more stable, he answered an ad looking for a service technician placed by Duffy’s Equipment Service, then an upstate N.Y. service agent. He joined the company, began training under Patrick Duffy and never looked back.

What’s new in college and university foodservice catering? A lot, as it turns out.

Retail, meal kits and wellness reign in healthcare foodservice.

When Klaus Mager visited China’s White Swan Hotel back in the ’70s, he was treated to an early preview of what was to become a sensation in the states decades later.

Behind any kitchen upgrade lies the drive for greater efficiency. Many chefs dream of a complete renovation. Not every operation, though, can fund an extravagant redesign in the back of the house.

The kitchen is a hot spot on university campuses across the nation — as well as in corporations, retirement centers, hospitals, food halls and other public spaces. And we’re not talking the familiar behind-the-scenes, back-of-the-house commercial kitchen where chefs and cooks do their thing. Rather, these emerging hot spots are kitchens designed and built as teaching facilities, where education, engagement and community building around food are primary objectives.

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