Cooking Equipment

Browse our articles on cooking equipment and find primers on a wide variety of specific product categories, including articles on how to specify, when to replace products and much more. 

THE Quarterly Product Knowledge Guide: Cook-and-Hold Equipment

Cook-and-hold ovens become staple pieces of foodservice equipment for various operations, including caterers, because of their ability to cook, roast, reheat and hold in the same cabinet. This applies to a variety of menu items, including roasted meats, seafood, poultry, vegetables and frozen entrees.

THE Quarterly Product Knowledge Guide: Induction Ranges

Induction cooking began in Europe and Asia but has become popular throughout the world in various applications, including catering and buffet lines. Operators can use induction ranges for traditional gas and electric units. Induction units plug into almost any electrical outlet and are suitable for display cooking.

THE Quarterly Product Knowledge Guide: High-Speed Ovens

High-speed ovens empower applications that would otherwise not be able to cook very efficiently, economically or to high-quality standards. Without these ovens, many foodservice operators would need to install a full-size kitchen to cook food, which is not a viable solution. These units also can complement an existing kitchen to help with speed of service on items that take a prohibitively long time to cook.

Panini Presses

 Commercial-grade panini presses are a fixture in cafes that offer hot sandwiches and quesadillas. Despite the name, panini presses, also referred to as sandwich presses or panini machines, can be used for heating up more than just the popular hot sandwiches.

Microwaves

Microwaves are typically one of the most underspecified pieces of equipment in commercial kitchens due to the stigma of being considered a tool for reheating, but they have become a staple in cafes because of their small size and versatility. Commercial microwaves complete the same tasks as several pieces of equipment, such as steaming, rethermalizing and defrosting, while utilizing less energy and space.

THE Quarterly Product Knowledge Guide: Pizza Ovens

Pizza operations typically utilize deck or conveyor ovens. When producing Neapolitan pizza, though, operators turn to wood-fired ovens. All three ovens operate in vastly different ways.

THE Quarterly Product Knowledge Guide: Fryers

Foodservice operators can choose from a variety of fryer types and styles, from models geared for general use to multi-purpose and specialty units. Donut fryers offer a shallow cooking depth, while deep vat units can cook items like fries and chicken. Flat bottom fryers can accommodate floating products, like fish and seafood, while operators commonly use larger conveyor units for production line frying as in a doughnut shop. Operators can place their fryers in a battery configuration, where five or six fryers sit side by side, and employ a single, central filtration system.

THE Quarterly Product Knowledge Guide: Combi Ovens

For cook lines with limited space, combi ovens take the place of multiple pieces of equipment, including convection ovens and steamers. These units also can replace cook and hold cabinets, proofers or slow cookers when used at low-heat settings.

THE Quarterly Product Knowledge Guide: Braising Pans

Braising pans, also called tilting skillets, are one of the most versatile pieces of equipment on the cook line and, as such, very utilitarian. Although commonly lumped into the steamer category, these units do not cook with steam. Their format consists of a griddle on the bottom and sides raised 8 to 11 inches.

THE Quarterly Product Knowledge Guide: Convection Ovens

Commercial kitchens rely on speed and consistency in the cook line, and convection ovens help achieve these goals. This equipment evenly cooks food using a fan to circulate dry heat at high velocities.