Foodservice Issues

Spotlights the challenges and opportunities that impact the application of foodservice equipment and supplies in the real world including green and energy efficiency concerns, foodservice equipment concerns, the impact of technology on foodservice, and the state of the foodservice economy.

Clover Food Lab’s Transition from Food Truck to Brick-and-Mortar Locations

Years after flooding urban markets across the country, concepts that started as food trucks are morphing into more permanent brick-and-mortar spaces. One such example of a food truck finding a permanent parking place in the brick-and-mortar world is Boston-based Clover Food Lab. Here Lucia Jazayeri, creative director at Clover Food Lab, maps out the company’s transition.

Functional by Design: Service Bars Ease Bottlenecks, Boost Volume

It’s a simple fact: Drinks have significantly higher profit margins than food, making smooth, efficient bar operations mission critical for most restaurants. The ability to serve more drinks — and to do so more quickly — equates directly to higher profits and that fact makes careful, strategic design the foundation for highly efficient, profitable bars. A cornerstone of that foundation for many is the service bar, an important area of beverage-program support that can help eliminate service bottlenecks and free the bar proper to focus on the business at hand — engaging with and servicing guests at the bar.

C-Store Specifying Tips

As the lines between retail and foodservice continue to blur, specifying opportunities in the convenience-store segment may rise. Ryan Krebs, director of food service for Rutter’s, a 72-unit chain based in York, Pa., outlines 5 c-store-specific equipment and design needs.

Where Ventless Applications Work

Ventless represents an emerging foodservice equipment segment. And like every other type of equipment, whether ventless is right for a specific application comes down to a variety of factors, including menu composition, service style, infrastructure and more.

The University of Alabama: Self-Serve Markets Offer Grab-and-Go Options on Campus

Self-serve markets continue to grow in popularity across a variety of foodservice operator segments. The University of Alabama, though, took this to the next level by combining this setup with an academic research initiative and then rolling out two more of the markets.

Authentically Ethnic

A number of terms continue to define foodservice today: artisanal, farm-to-table, global and regional, to name just a few. Almost all of them tie in one way or another to the concept of authenticity. Today’s consumers demand their food not just taste great but also connect with its origins, whether that be in terms of ingredients or prep method. That’s particularly true when it comes to ethnic dishes.

Community Matters Cafe Rehabs its Space and Staff

 For 81 years, Charlotte Rescue Mission has helped people struggling with addiction to achieve long-term sobriety, find employment and stable housing, and restore and build healthy relationships. The leaders wanted to expand the mission’s program to give graduates an opportunity to thrive, rather than just survive, in the community.

Functional by Design: Designing to the Needs of Drive-Thru

The original foodservice convenience, drive-thru options at restaurants have been a big deal for American consumers since at least the 1960s. And while the scope of convenience continues to snowball, drive-thrus remain a big deal and an increasingly critical part of the American foodservice landscape.

Beverages Play a Prominent Role in Operators’ Menu and Prototype Designs

Given the tight market conditions that continue to permeate today’s foodservice industry, operators remain wise when they follow the flow of consumers money. Oftentimes following that flow leads right to the beverage business. In fact, beverage programs remain a key ingredient in many operators’ recipe for success.