Specification Credits

Of course, in order to specify the correct piece of equipment or supply item, foodservice operators and their supply chain partners need to understand which questions they should ask.

Equipment and supply items represent the tools of the foodservice trade. Few — if any — people enter the foodservice industry because they have an affinity for a specific type of equipment. Rather, they enter the business with a culinary vision or a passion to serve. Foodservice equipment and supplies? Well, they simply represent a means to an end.

This reality does not, however, lessen the important role that foodservice equipment and supplies play in a successful operation. Writing a solid product specification and properly using that item can have a profound impact on the success of a given foodservice operation. That’s because the proper equipment and supply item can help foodservice operators maximize their use of capital by managing those pesky little variables that can often make or break their businesses, such as proper labor, food cost, food safety and much more.

Of course, in order to specify the correct piece of equipment or supply item, foodservice operators and their supply chain partners need to understand which questions they should ask. And in each issue of FE&S’ Product Knowledge Guide Quarterly, our editors strive to provide our
readers with a list of considerations to weigh when purchasing or specifying an equipment or supply item. We also look to shed some additional light on maintenance considerations.

In developing the stories in each issue, we strive to provide a balanced and thoughtful overview of each product category that includes perspectives and input from multiple members of the supply chain community. We do this because each member of the supply chain brings a unique and valuable perspective to the product specification process.

Dealers, theoretically, have an intimate knowledge of the way their operator customers go to market. Consultants are experts in maximizing throughput, flow and more as these factors relate to equipment specification and placement. Service agents see the good, the bad and the ugly when it comes to equipment installation, use and maintenance. And reps have a detailed knowledge of the product lines they represent.

Now, it may not be productive or feasible for an operator to include each member of the supply chain in every purchasing decision. However, operators should look to leverage the individual members of their supply chain as often as possible to make informed purchasing decisions that hopefully allow them to pursue their passions.

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